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Bees get lost, cell phone fault?



Bees get lost, cell phone fault?


Rome – Bees suffer from cell phone calls. Not so much because in the quiet of a field of flowers every ringtone seems an abuse, but rather because of the emissions of hi-tech trinkets. A group of researchers from Landau University support this – without making the trumpets ring too much.

Dr Jochen Kuhn, coordinator of the research project, confirmed that there could be correlations between the abandonment of hives and the presence of mobile terminals . It has long been known that current lines affect the behavior of bees. Apart from making the environment “electrifying”, the presence of anomalous magnetic fields and so on, according to numerous studies, would cause negative effects on the fauna. But from here to consider the gadget most loved by man a danger for beekeeping, however, it passes. George Carlo, the best-known American scientist who dealt in the 90s with resolving fears about the dangers of telephony, said only that “the possibility is real”. In short, mobile technology could cause bees to lose their orientation not allowing a safe return to the hive .

But what is happening to the bee colonies? Almost half of their population disappeared in the United States last fall, fueling concern for many. The researchers call the phenomenon Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD): the hive is abandoned, leaving only the Queens, the eggs and a few small worker bees. The desaparecido seem to disappear into thin air, probably destined to die far from their home.

As reported by the Independent, however, the CCD has already given the first symptoms also in Europe. Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Spain and Greece they would fall into the grip. “23 of the 40 hives I own have been abandoned,” said John Chapple, one of London’s largest breeders. Yet the UK’s Department of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs has confirmed for the umpteenth time that there is no evidence of this phenomenon.

The problem, according to experts, is that it could take years to be able to accurately demonstrate some relationship between beehive death and mobile technology. And if someone suggests turning off the cell phone in the bee health campaign, others think differently: like Glenn Reynolds, IT guru, who on his blog has decided to dismantle the theories on “mobile CCD” piece by piece.

Dario d’Elia